wnycradiolab:

fastcodesign:

The Sleep Schedules Of 27 Of History’s Greatest Minds
What do Freud, Maria Abramovi, Beethoven, and you have in common? For one, the need to sleep.
The science of sleep and its glorious effects on creativity, productivity, and sanity gets a lot of press these days. That said, the sleep habits of some of your favorite writers, musicians, and artists may surprise you a little.
The bedtimes and rising times of history’s greatest minds are inventively illustrated in Mason Currey’s Daily Rituals: How Artists Work. The infographic seems to debunk the myth that geniuses stay up through the wee hours working manically, and that you’re more creative when you’re tired—most of these 27 luminaries got a wholesome eight hours a night.
Read More>

Interesting approach, Balzac.

wnycradiolab:

fastcodesign:

The Sleep Schedules Of 27 Of History’s Greatest Minds

What do Freud, Maria Abramovi, Beethoven, and you have in common? For one, the need to sleep.

The science of sleep and its glorious effects on creativity, productivity, and sanity gets a lot of press these days. That said, the sleep habits of some of your favorite writers, musicians, and artists may surprise you a little.

The bedtimes and rising times of history’s greatest minds are inventively illustrated in Mason Currey’s Daily Rituals: How Artists Work. The infographic seems to debunk the myth that geniuses stay up through the wee hours working manically, and that you’re more creative when you’re tired—most of these 27 luminaries got a wholesome eight hours a night.

Read More>

Interesting approach, Balzac.

beingblog:

“There are days when I am convinced that Heaven starts already, now, in this ordinary life, just as it is, in all its incompleteness, yet, this is where Heaven starts. See within yourself, if you can find it. I walked through the field in front of the house, lots of swallows flying, everywhere! Some very near me. It was magical. We are already one, yet we know it not.”
~Thomas Merton (via crashinglybeautiful)
A View towards the Old Town and the Southern part of Stockholm city taken in 1900 by Carl Curman.

beingblog:

“There are days when I am convinced that Heaven starts already, now, in this ordinary life, just as it is, in all its incompleteness, yet, this is where Heaven starts. See within yourself, if you can find it.
I walked through the field in front of the house, lots of swallows flying, everywhere! Some very near me. It was magical.
We are already one, yet we know it not.”

~Thomas Merton (via crashinglybeautiful)

A View towards the Old Town and the Southern part of Stockholm city taken in 1900 by Carl Curman.

beingblog:

Just mesmerized with this image of a deconstructed galaxy cluster of RX J1532.9+3021, located about 3.9 billion light years from Earth. Reminds me of this great conversation with Natalie Batalha: 

We don’t get to experience that very often, having this complete dome over your head, which is the universe. But the experience that I had was that I saw the Milky Way arcing through the sky. I saw planets that were in the sky. I think there was a crescent moon that was in the sky. I could see the large and small Magellanic Clouds, which are satellite galaxies of our own Milky Way. I saw the Coalsack Nebula, which is this giant molecular cloud between us and the center of the galaxy. I saw all of these things and I knew something about them. I had knowledge of them and this knowledge of them gave me three-dimensionality to the universe. It transformed itself.
It was not a dome over my head. It was a three-dimensional universe that I was suspended in and that was an amazing moment for me. It changed the way I saw the universe and my place in the universe. And it was afforded me through my knowledge and my studies of astronomy and I think that it’s a gift, and I wish it for humanity. I really, really deeply do.

Photo by NASA/ESA/STScI/M.Postman & CLASH team

beingblog:

Just mesmerized with this image of a deconstructed galaxy cluster of RX J1532.9+3021, located about 3.9 billion light years from Earth. Reminds me of this great conversation with Natalie Batalha:

We don’t get to experience that very often, having this complete dome over your head, which is the universe. But the experience that I had was that I saw the Milky Way arcing through the sky. I saw planets that were in the sky. I think there was a crescent moon that was in the sky. I could see the large and small Magellanic Clouds, which are satellite galaxies of our own Milky Way. I saw the Coalsack Nebula, which is this giant molecular cloud between us and the center of the galaxy. I saw all of these things and I knew something about them. I had knowledge of them and this knowledge of them gave me three-dimensionality to the universe. It transformed itself.

It was not a dome over my head. It was a three-dimensional universe that I was suspended in and that was an amazing moment for me. It changed the way I saw the universe and my place in the universe. And it was afforded me through my knowledge and my studies of astronomy and I think that it’s a gift, and I wish it for humanity. I really, really deeply do.

Photo by NASA/ESA/STScI/M.Postman & CLASH team

"

And on the subject of burning books: I want to congratulate librarians, not famous for their physical strength or their powerful political connections or their great wealth, who, all over this country, have staunchly resisted anti-democratic bullies who have tried to remove certain books from their shelves, and have refused to reveal to thought police the names of persons who have checked out those titles.

So the America I loved still exists, if not in the White House or the Supreme Court or the Senate or the House of Representatives or the media. The America I love still exists at the front desks of our public libraries.

"
– Kurt Vonnegut, A Man Without a Country (via the-bookworm-life)